Serious news: We'll be back in NY the 21st of November for a little bit. See this email for some but not all the details.

Yves Lambeau
Yves Lambeau
Yves Lambeau

Yves Lambeau

Born in 1942 in Tunisia, died in 2018 in the Luberon, France.

I was introduced to Yves’ work while visiting my father-in-law 19 years ago. Around any corner of the house it was easy to find a bowl, a plate, a pitcher, a vase, a teapot, etc made by Yves. That first summer, Marco and I visited Yves at his studio. I was broke at the time but I wanted to select one really special piece to take back to New York. That piece was a coffee bowl, the same bowl we stocked at KIOSK for 12 years. Maybe you have one?  After our first conversation, Yves and I began a long thread that took place every summer, we spoke about art, pottery, nature, the spirit and work.

Yves was particular and honestly, fairly peculiar. Ceramics was his thing. He had 3 kilns at his home studio. Concocting new glazes by experimenting with chemical combinations was his passion. Socializing, less so, but I loved visiting him and our conversations. He had a wonderful heart and a dedication to his art that went beyond. It was inspiring to see how his work took over his existence.

For years I spoke to him about producing plates for us, both for me personally and for KIOSK. The answer was always a solid NO, he hated making plates and plus, Marco’s stepmother once rejected an order. I guess he saw down the road what could be coming. Even though he hated the process of making flat plates, he believed in the value of everyday objects and gave as much of his soul to those inexpensive pieces as he did for his fine art because he believed all forms of his work could touch upon people in the simplest way, straight to the heart. It was only a matter of putting your soul into what you created.

Everyday things yes, yet, what Yves was most into were his organic forms. Ceramics that looked like a squash, a melon and other unidentified, organic matter. He threw them on the wheel and slowly, as they dried, molded them into the shapes they became, giving them life, with a bit of his, along the way. These were his masterpieces, the things he really got a vibe from and adored. Called “cristallisations et nucléations” he glazed them with those chemical recipes he carefully formulated over time. The technique was from the Art Nouveau period but what he achieved through endless experimentation became something more. Silky smooth and cool to the touch with a surface pattern of crystal that resembles a number of patterns found in nature. He pushed the limits and found something new. Some things man-made that resemble nature. Yves, in short, made beautiful art.